26/07/2017
On Wednesday, 2 August The Kids’ Cancer Project hits the road, calling on all Australians to get behind kids with cancer by supporting science.

Cancer kills more children than any other disease in Australia which is why Col Reynolds, founder of The Kids’ Cancer Project, felt compelled to take the message on the road.

The former coach driver is once again donning his coachman’s hat to drive nearly 10,000kms starting in his hometown of Townsville and stopping in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and the ACT before arriving in Sydney on the first day of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 1 September.
 
On one of Col's day trips for kids in hospital.

Events will be held in cities and towns along the route to bring awareness to the issues, asking people to join The Science Project by making a pledge to support science that will save kids with cancer.

It is also an opportunity to thank the inspiring Australians already putting their support behind science and research – whether it be grappling with the molecular structure in a lab, raising funds and awareness in the school playground or most importantly the children and families affected.

Reynolds established the independent national charity in 1993 after discovering funding research and clinical trials were the only way to stop a children’s disease more deadly than any other.

The founder initially became aware of kids’ cancer when he was driving past a children’s hospital in the 1980s. He was moved to invest his time and energy into taking effected children on fun day trips. But after seeing too many children die or live with the effects of cancer, he realised he wanted to give them much more than just one day.
 

Col with sisters, Evie and Alicia

“In Australia, 950 children are diagnosed each year and three die every week,” Col says. “I always carry with me the pain and suffering that I’ve seen too many of my young friends and their families go through. As I entered my 78th year, I renewed my promise to continue to fight for the lives of these children every day of mine. I invite others to join me, so we can find a cure and transform treatment.”

In the lead up to Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in September, The Kids’ Cancer Project is inviting Australians to go online and make the pledge for science. “Together we can show the kids suffering with cancer, and their families, that they don’t stand alone,” said Reynolds.
 
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