Successful applicants will be announced in July

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The Kids’ Cancer Project supports research projects that will have the greatest chance of clinical success in the improvement of treatments for childhood cancers. 

While The Kids’ Cancer Project defines a child as an individual up to the age of 18 years, projects relating to adolescents and young adults are also supported as one of our extended research priorities. 

Grant applications are reviewed and shortlisted by an expert Research Advisory Committee for consideration by The Kids' Cancer Project Board of Directors.

Enquiries

Contact research@tkcp.org.au or 1800 651 180.

Frequently Asked Questions

When do applications for funding close?
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Applications open 1 March 9am (AEDT) and close 31 March 5pm (AEDT) annually. 
 
Shortlisted candidates may be invited to present their proposal to the Research Advisory Committee in June.
 
Funding for successful applicants commences from 1 July. 
What are the selection criteria?
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Research project proposals submitted to The Kids’ Cancer Project are reviewed using the criteria below. They are ranked and shortlisted by an expert Research Advisory Committee for consideration by The Kids' Cancer Project  Board of Directors.
 
1. Importance of proposed research to clinical practice or scientific field
2. Scientific quality of application
3. Anticipated benefit for advancing childhood cancer research
4. Likelihood to produce translational benefits
5. Feasibility of proposed research
6. Potential to test a promising and novel idea
7. Potential for significant future research
8. Track record of applicants
9. Value for money
10. Overall quality of application
If successful, when does funding commence?
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Funding for successful applicants commences from 1 July. 
Is a face to face presentation required?
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Shortlisted candidates may be invited to present their proposal to the Research Advisory Committee in June.
What amount of funding can be requested?
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There are no restrictions on the proposed maximum budget for your research project, however as an indication, the 2017 funding round saw 33 research projects funded with an average commitment of $115,000.
 
In some cases, initial applications requiring multiple years of funding may rely on the achievement of key milestones in order for The Kids’ Cancer Project to continue support.
 
Organisational infrastructure costs cannot be included in the budget. Grant proposals can include salary support.   
What budget restrictions are applicable?
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There are no restrictions on the proposed maximum budget for your research project, however as an indication, the 2017 funding round saw 33 research projects funded with an average commitment of $115,000.
 
In some cases, initial applications requiring multiple years of funding may rely on the achievement of key milestones in order for The Kids’ Cancer Project to continue support.
 
Organisational infrastructure costs cannot be included in the budget. Grant proposals can include salary support.
What is the duration of funding?
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The maximum length of each grant cannot exceed five years.
What are the rules on location for funding?
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The Kids' Cancer Project seeks to improve survival and eliminate suffering for all Australian children with cancer. At the same time, the charity understands that there can be major obstacles to achieving outcomes at a national level. Therefore, initiatives will be supported at a local or state level on condition that findings and knowledge are shared both nationally and internationally.
 
Limit three (3) applications per institution for funding of new projects.  
 
What are the eligibility rules?
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The Kids’ Cancer Project Board reviews alignment and coverage against the charity’s six research priorities. In order to be eligible for consideration, research project proposals must directly align with at least one of the priorities listed below.
 
Improving survival and treatments
Improving treatments for childhood cancer will have a direct impact on survival rates. The Kids' Cancer Project will gain an understanding of best practice and emerging technologies spanning all modalities of treatment. The Kids' Cancer Project will support research with this focus as a top priority.
 
Late effects / survivorship
Two-thirds of survivors report at least one chronic medical condition and one-third report at least one severe or life threatening medical condition. While current data dissects mortality rates, it does not unveil the important consideration of quality of life. The Kids' Cancer Project places importance on the ongoing quality of life of survivors of childhood cancer and will invest in identifying new treatments with greater potential for healthy outcomes for all children with cancer.
 
Capabilities
Capabilities refers to building capacity, infrastructure and collaboration around childhood cancer to expedite our mission. The Kids' Cancer Project will promote programs and initiatives that will improve collaboration between research facilities, provide expertise and knowledge transfer of research data and findings. The Kids' Cancer Project will support the career development of the next generation of childhood cancer researchers to build on their success.
 
Understanding childhood cancer
The Kids' Cancer Project will strive to ensure that outcomes for Australian children are in line with best practice as benchmarked against international standards. The Kids' Cancer Project will selectively participate in research that builds on the body of knowledge surrounding the causes of childhood cancer.
 
Adolescents and young adults (AYAs)
The Australian health system defines a child as an individual between 0 and 15 years old. The Kids' Cancer Project has extended their definition to include 0 to 18-year-olds in response to the significant drop in survival rates once a child reaches 16. The Kids' Cancer Project recognises that young adults are an important consideration in the pursuit of better treatments and a cure for childhood cancer.
 
Access to care
The Kids' Cancer Project will advocate for equal access to care for children with cancer, regardless of geographical or socioeconomic status.
What are The Kids' Cancer Project research priorities?
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In order to be eligible for consideration, research project proposals must directly align with at least one of The Kid's Cancer Project research priorities listed below:
 
Improving survival and treatments
Improving treatments for childhood cancer will have a direct impact on survival rates. The Kids' Cancer Project will gain an understanding of best practice and emerging technologies spanning all modalities of treatment. The Kids' Cancer Project will support research with this focus as a top priority.
 
Late effects / survivorship
Two-thirds of survivors report at least one chronic medical condition and one-third report at least one severe or life threatening medical condition. While current data dissects mortality rates, it does not unveil the important consideration of quality of life. The Kids' Cancer Project places importance on the ongoing quality of life of survivors of childhood cancer and will invest in identifying new treatments with greater potential for healthy outcomes for all children with cancer.
 
Capabilities
Capabilities refers to building capacity, infrastructure and collaboration around childhood cancer to expedite our mission. The Kids' Cancer Project will promote programs and initiatives that will improve collaboration between research facilities, provide expertise and knowledge transfer of research data and findings. The Kids' Cancer Project will support the career development of the next generation of childhood cancer researchers to build on their success.
 
Understanding childhood cancer
The Kids' Cancer Project will strive to ensure that outcomes for Australian children are in line with best practice as benchmarked against international standards. The Kids' Cancer Project will selectively participate in research that builds on the body of knowledge surrounding the causes of childhood cancer.
 
Adolescents and young adults (AYAs)
The Australian health system defines a child as an individual between 0 and 15 years old. The Kids' Cancer Project has extended their definition to include 0 to 18-year-olds in response to the significant drop in survival rates once a child reaches 16. The Kids' Cancer Project recognises that young adults are an important consideration in the pursuit of better treatments and a cure for childhood cancer.
 
Access to care
The Kids' Cancer Project will advocate for equal access to care for children with cancer, regardless of geographical or socioeconomic status.
Who can I contact if I have a question?
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Email research@tkcp.org.au or telephone 1800 651 158.
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